Module 5: Invertebrates II

October 21, 2014 PowerPoint Honors Marine Biology Module 5 Bivalves Clam and Squid dissection

We are continuing our study of invertebrates to include phyla Mollusca commonly called Mollusks, and represent the most species in the ocean than any other group. They include clams, abalone, cone shells, squid and octopuses.

Experiment 5.A:  Univalve and Bivalve Shell Identification

Most mollusks have a bilaterally symmetric soft body protected by a shell made of calcium carbonate. The shell provides protection from the elements and predators and can also provide body support. In our lab we identified, classified, labeled and drew various shells.

Experiment 5.A:  Shell Identification

Experiment 5.A: Univalve and Bivalve Shell Identification

Experiment 5.B:  Squid Dissection

In class we dissected a squid.  View the following virtual dissections for the squid and the clam.

Squid Diagram for Experiment 5.B

Squid Diagram for Experiment 5.B

Squid Dissection

Squid Dissection

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A successfully Dissection

A successfully dissection

The quiz next week will be to label the parts of the squid.  Be able to identify tentacles, suckers, arms, eye, mantle wall, mantle, gill, tail, fin and beak.

Experiment 5.1:  Clam Dissection

On pages 104 -105 you will find the clam dissection.  View the virtual dissection below.  In your lab book draw a diagram and label the clam.

Homework:

  • Module 5  read pages 107 – 124;
  • Answer On Your Own Questions 5.1 to 5.6;
  • Study Guide Questions: define: a-e and 2-9;
  • Finish Experiment 5.A Bivalves and Univalves; 5.B The Squid Dissection and 5.1 The Clam Dissection in your Lab book;
  • Quiz: know the squid dissection and be able to label its parts.
  • Class Challenge:  Best Costume.

On a personal note:  Madyson R and her family are moving to Georgia.  It was a pleasure having you in class and we will miss you.

Have a good week.  -Mrs. S

 

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s