SeaPerch Launch Day

Getting Ready to launch SeaPerch

Getting Ready to launch SeaPerch

Rain and the rumble of thunder did not deter the four groups of Marine Biology engineers from successfully launching the SeaPerch robotic and running it through the course set up with hula-hoops in a backyard pool!  Five hoops were set up in a course and each robotic made it through successfully.

SeaPerch Bowers 2

SeaPerch Bowers 4

One group had some repair work to complete as the family cat chewed several holes into the electrical cord.  But the competent team (with additional group members) set to work splicing together the cord.

Bad Kitty!

Bad Kitty!

I am still waiting to receive pictures and video from that day so that they can be included on this post.

seaperch logo

In the meantime, it is important that each of you complete the following post-launch survey:  Post-Activity: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/seaperch_post?c=DWKKFJQ

May 5 is our last day of class.  It will be a full class so arrive prepared for an exciting class of  challenges and fun.

Have a good week! -Mrs. S

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Module 15: Ocean Resources – Part 2

Congratulations to our Class Challenge winner Sam!

The Champ!

The Champ!

Arm wrestling

April 21, 2015 PowerPoint Honors Marine Biology Modular 16 Deep Water Horizon Well

PowerPoint Honors Marine Biology Ocean Resources Part 2 April 18 2013

BP Deepwater Horizon Well, 2010

BP Deepwater Horizon Well, 2010

BP Deepwater Horizon Well – Five Years Later

April 20, 2010, Methane gas blew out from a wellhead a mile below the Gulf of Mexico.  At a Pressure 150 times greater than air at the Earth’s surface, the gas shot up through a drilling riser to the Deepwater Horizon oil platform and platform and exploded, killing 11 workers.

Fire raged 87 days, spilling 2.5 million gallons of crude oil per day.

Fire raged 87 days, spilling 2.5 million gallons of crude oil per day.

It was the worst offshore oil spill in history. It continued to gush oil for 87 days, spilling 200 million gallons ( 2.5 million gallons per day) of crude spilling crude oil in a four-dimension disaster that reached from the Gulf’s floor to the its surface, and its seashore.

What happened to all the oil? Some of it was burned off, some of it was skimmed up and also applied chemical dispersants used to break up some of it so that it would either dissipate, become soluble or be small enough for microbes to eat. But 5 years later, up to 10 percent remains in marshes and anywhere from 3 to 30 percent – though 10 percent is probably a good estimate – is on the ocean floor.   We discussed in class the numerous factors that are involved in this disaster and its effects and the clean up. (See PowerPoint)

DISSECTIONS:  GAR, TALAPIA, BREAM, CAT FISH

We were able to dissect 4 difference fish specimens in class.  Photos by Natalie.

Gar Fish

Gar Fish

Gar Tail

Gar Tail

Talapia

Talapia

Talapia Head

Talapia Head

Talapia Tail

Talapia Tail

Talapia Scales

Talapia Scales

Bream

Bream

Cat Fish Head

Cat Fish Head

Cat Fish

Cat Fish

Scale

Scale

Homework:

  • Finish reading Module 15 Ocean Resources
  • Complete OYO’s
  • Complete Study Guide
  • Take all Module tests through Module 15

seaperch logo

April 28 class will be held at the Bowers’ home for our SeaPerch challenge.  I will be leaving campus at 10:30 am and will return to campus by 1:15 pm.  I will be happy to transport students who need a ride.  We will be having lunch after our challenge.  Hot dogs, buns, condiments and paper goods will be provided.  If you wish to bring something to share, it will be welcome.

Have a good week! – Mrs. S

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Module 15: Ocean Resources

April 14, 2014 PowerPoint Honors Marine Biology Module 15 Ocean Resources Apriil 11, 2013

Study Notes for Module 15:  MODULE 15 CLASS STUDY NOTES MARCH 22

As our textbook asks, “What is the most popular food resource from the sea?”, we would most likely answer, “Fish.”  Although, correct we discovered that this answer can be further explained by delineating between finfish and shellfish, and not to be excluded are the seaweeds.

In Experiment 15.1, Mapping Ocean Resources.  Resources from the ocean are found throughout the world.  Most of the world’s major fisheries are located near the coasts, collecting both pelagic and demersal organisms.  Most of these sites are concentrated  where upwelling enhances primary production and where the wide continental shelf areas are around the world. Finish this lab and have it ready for class on Thursday.

We further view Florida Aquaculture.

ADDITIONAL OCEAN RESOURCES

ATTENTION STUDENTS:

We have specimens to dissect at our next class!  Bring your dissection kits.  I will provide gloves.

HOMEWORK:

  1. Take Module 14 Test
  2. Read Module 15 to page 362
  3. OYO 15.1 to 15.3
  4. Study Guide  a-b  2 – 9
  5. Class Challenge:  Arm Wrestling
  6. Quiz on Module 15 to page 362

Have a good week! -Mrs. S

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Module 14: The Deep Ocean – Part 2

April 7, 2015 PowerPoint Honors Marine Biology Module 14 the deep ocean part 2 April 4 2013

You have done a good job presenting deep sea creatures this past week.  Those of you who did not have a chance to present will be able to do at our next class.

All the  SeaPerch projects are about finished.  If you have finished, the Team Leader should give it a test run prior to April 28.  If you are going to mount an underwater camera on the SeaPerch, do so at the test run.  Those of you who said that that you have hula-hoops to share for launch day, bring them to class on April 21.  Cameryn will be setting up the course at her pool and we want to have it completed ahead of time.

SeaPerch Team nearing completion

SeaPerch Team nearing completion

As we continue our study of the Deep Ocean, we learned that scientists only know about 5% of what lies in the Deep Ocean.  At these great depths, pressure is the determining factor for where an organism can live. The deeper depth, the greater the pressure.  Since the deep ocean is devoid of light, there us no need for countershading.  However, bioluminescence plays a significant role in an organisms ability to gather food and reproduce.

In the deep ocean there are the deep trenches and mid-ocean ridges.  These are areas of the earth’s crust that are slowly moving away from each other.  Sea water moves down through these cracks and gets heated to very high temperatures.  It then spews out vent areas, carrying with it dissolved minerals and hydrogen sulfide. We call these Hydrothermal Vents.

Hydrogen Sulfide is toxic to most creatures. However, around them there are thriving communities that live there.  They are like an oases in a desert!  Scientists have learned that there are types of bacteria that can extract the energy contained in certain minerals and use that energy to make organic matter.  They use a process similar to photosynthesis, but they substitute chemical energy for solar energy.  This process is called chemosynthesis. The two deep ocean vent communities that we studied are called Black Smokers and Cold Seeps.

Homework:

  1. Finish Module 14 reading ….
  2. Finish OYO Questions    …..
  3. Finish Study Guide questions ….
  4. Class Challenge – How many sit ups can you do in 1 minute?
  5. Class Quiz on the Deep Ocean

Have a good week! – Mrs. S

“Expect to have hope rekindled.  Expect your prayers to be answered in wondrous ways. The dry seasons in life do not last.  The Spring rains will come again.”                                                                                                                                                             -Sarah Ban Breathnach

“Rejoice in confident hope.  Be patient in trouble, and keep on praying.”                                                                                                                                                           -Romans 12:12

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Module 14: The Deep Ocean

March 31, 2015 PowerPoint Honors Marine Biology Module 14 The Deep Ocean March 28, 2013

Crazy Hair Day

Crazy Hair Day

We have learned about the surface layer of the ocean: the epipelagic zone. As we continue our study of the ocean divisions, we will now investigate the deep ocean, where light is not abundant.  This area can be divided into two major regions:  The mesopelagic zone (200 meters to 1000 meters)and the deep ocean (1000 meters to 6000 meters and beyond).

Because there is so little to no light in these regions, organisms are specially equipped in their body design to live in this region and to find food.

The Epipelagic Zone

The Epipelagic Zone

You selected a deep sea creature to prepare for your oral presentation to the class. Prepare a 3 minute presentation for class this Tuesday.

BUBBLES-N-BUNNY-EARS

Homework:

  • Take Module 13 Test
  • Read Module 14 pages 333 – 351
  • Answer On Your Own questions 14.1 – 14.11
  • Answer Study Guide questions 1 – 28
  • Oral presentation for your Deep Ocean creature
  • Notebook check on April 7 Through Module 13.
  • Class Challenge: Act out lines from your favorite movie or TV show.

Wishing you a blessed Easter! -Mrs. S

“He is not here, for He has risen, just as He said. Come, see the place where He was lying.”       – Matthew 28:6

Jesus is Risen!

Jesus is Risen!

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Module 13: The Epipelagic Zone – Part 2

March 24, 2015  PowerPoint:  Honors Marine Biology The Epipelagic Zone Part 2 March 21, 2013

The Epipelagic Zone

The Epipelagic Zone   

Compare these two diagrams so that you are very familiar with the terms:

pelagic, neritic, oceanic, photic and epipelagic.

Study Notes:  Marine Biology module-13-epipelagic-zone-notes

Marine Life in the Pelagic Zones

Marine Life in the Pelagic Zones

Since we were not able to connect to the internet at our last class, review the following videos that will continue to help you understand the Epipelagic Zone.

Homework:

  1. Finish Module 13 reading
  2. OYO’s and Study Guide
  3. Quiz on Epipelagic zone:  Class Study Notes
  4. Class challenge:  Crazy Hair Day

Have a good week! -Mrs. S

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Module 13: Epipelagic Zone

March 17, 2015 PowerPoint Honors Marine Biology Module 13 the Epipelagic Zone March 7, 2013

Study Notes:  Marine Biology module-13-epipelagic-zone-notes

The uppermost layer of the pelagic division is called the epipelagic zone. This is the area of water column that extends from the surface down to about 200 meters (650 feet).  This zone overlaps the photic zone. This layer of the ocean’s surface is where light can penetrate to  allow for photosynthesis.

The Epipelagic Zone

The Epipelagic Zone

Homework:

  1. Take Module 12 Test
  2. Read Module 13 to page 317
  3. Answer OYO 13.1 – 13.7
  4. Study Guide Questions define a-d; 2-15
  5. Finish lab book:  Brine Shrimp
  6. Quiz:  Epipelagic Zone – See Study Notes for Module 13
  7. Class challenge: Share your favorite poem.

Have a good week! -Mrs. Smith

kayaking in siesta key

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment